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Does North Carolina Recognize Quickie Divorces?

Does North Carolina Recognize Quickie Divorces?

Does North Carolina Recognize Quickie Divorces? By Amy A. Edwards In North Carolina, parties seeking a divorce must show that at least one of the spouses has resided in the state for at least six months when either spouse files for the divorce. As of the date that a spouse files a claim for divorce, the parties must be separated for at least twelve months. When they separated, at least one of the spouses had to intend for the separation to be permanent. Why Do People Want Quickie Divorces? Besides the obvious desire to be legally single and/or remarry, there are several other reasons people get quickie divorces. There are those who want to get a divorce without the one-year separation, or those who haven’t lived in North Carolina for at least six months at the time the divorce is filed. Another incentive for quickie divorces is the payment of alimony. The deadline for filing an alimony claim in North Carolina is the entry of the divorce decree. If there isn’t an alimony claim already pending when the divorce decree is granted, it permanently expires and can’t be filed again. In other words, someone might try to slide the divorce past the other spouse with the hope that he or she won’t have time to file for alimony. The U.S. Constitution Our Constitution protects citizens with the right to due process of law. The courts only have the right to make rulings (i.e., legal authority) if they have jurisdiction. Without it, the court can’t issue valid court orders or decrees. A party to a lawsuit is entitled to legal notice and an opportunity to be heard and defend himself or herself. This usually occurs by service of the summons and complaint, when a sheriff hands a copy of the paperwork to the defendant, or the defendant signs to accept certified mail. Divorces by Other States When one U.S. state enters a decree, another state must generally accept it as valid. The Constitution requires one state to recognize it, giving it what is called full faith and credit. There are exceptions. North Carolina or any state can reject a decree of another state if that decree was fraudulent or the court did not have jurisdiction (i.e., the defendant wasn’t served with a copy of the paperwork). In other words, if it wasn’t valid in the state that issued it, then...

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The Live-in Girlfriend’s Income & Expenses in Alimony Cases

The Live-in Girlfriend’s Income & Expenses in Alimony Cases

The Live-in Girlfriend’s Income & Expenses in Alimony Cases By Amy A. Edwards Unlike child support, North Carolina does not use any Guidelines or formula when deciding what amount alimony should be. Instead, the judge decides whether the low-earning spouse is entitled to alimony, and if so, whether the higher-earning spouse can afford to pay it. All of these decisions are made in the discretion of the judge. If you lined up ten judges to hear the same alimony case, you would very likely have ten different rulings. This is not only frustrating for the parties, but also for attorneys who don’t have the benefit of a crystal ball. What’s the Deal with Alimony? By state law, the judge must decide what each person’s income is, and what each person’s reasonable living expenses are. The judge reviews a budget prepared by each party called a financial affidavit, about which each party testifies under oath. The financially dependent spouse must prove more reasonable living expenses than income, which is a financial shortfall. The supporting spouse tries to show expenses and income so as to avoid showing a surplus of money. In other words, the lower-earning spouse wants to show a deficit, and the higher-earning spouse wants to avoid having a surplus of money left over after paying living expenses. A financial surplus is money that can be used for paying alimony. Frequently, the expenses each party asserts are quite different from what a judge decides is reasonable. For example, a spouse who earns $26,000 per year will likely have a hard time justifying a $700 per month vehicle payment as a reasonable living expense. Courts often expect both parties to tighten their belts after a separation. The judge in that example might think the vehicle could be sold or traded in exchange for a vehicle with a $350 per month payment. In that event, the judge would credit that spouse with $350 as a reasonable vehicle payment. Why Do I Say The Girlfriend? Although alimony is payable to husbands or wives, the disparity of incomes almost always means the wife is the dependent spouse in Eastern North Carolina. Usually, the wife seeks alimony, and the husband tries to defend against paying it, or at least tries to lower the amount of it. Based on this assumption, the wife loses alimony if she resides with a boyfriend or remarries. On the...

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A (Very Brief) History of Women Separation and Necessaries

A (Very Brief) History of Women Separation and Necessaries

A (Very Brief) History of Women Separation and Necessaries  By Amy A. Edwards Did you ever wonder why “they might come after me” if the bill collector can’t find your ex? It is because North Carolina uses the doctrine of necessaries. When you hear about a duty of support, you think of alimony but that applies only between spouses. But when a third-party, such as a doctor or hospital, provides necessary services to a spouse, that third-party has the right to seek payment from the other spouse in certain circumstances, based on the doctrine of necessaries. This arises in both services (medical and non-medical) and goods but necessaries are frequently disputed in the context of medical care. Those services are usually expensive enough to merit the time and cost of litigating them in court. The general rule is that a third-party who provides medical services that were necessary for health and well-being of the husband or wife may seek payment from the other spouse. [FN1] The Exception to the Rule: Separation and Notice North Carolina recognizes a quirky exception to the general rule. If you and your spouse are separated when he or she receives the medical care and the provider has actual notice that you are separated, you have a defense. [FN1] In other words, current law says that just being separated isn’t legally adequate to get you off the hook for your spouse’s medical bill. The third-party provider must be put on notice that you are separated. As you might imagine, most people won’t go to the hospital and elect to mention that their spouse shouldn’t be liable for payment of the bill. People can avoid being at the mercy of the law by making their own agreement. Usually, separation agreements address this by agreeing the person who receives care must reimburse the other spouse if he or she is forced to pay it. Early Law: Wife’s Expenses The colonies brought with them British law, which at the time said that unless the wife left her husband for an unjustified reason, he was responsible for her necessary expenses, i.e., her necessaries. Technically, if a husband failed to provide for her, a wife was legally entitled to obtain what was necessary, at which time he would owe the provider of goods or services on her behalf. This assumes she was in a position to enforce those rights. But unlike a single woman,...

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Free-Trader Agreements in North Carolina

Free-Trader Agreements in North Carolina

Free-Trader Agreements in North Carolina When a married couple separates, if they can reach an agreement on all of the issues between them, they may choose to sign a separation agreement. It is a contract that says how they have agreed to divide property and debt, how family support will be provided, if any, and what they will do about parenting time if they have children together. One of the usual terms contained in it is a free-trader-agreement (FTA). If there is no separation agreement, an FTA can be a short contract by itself. What’s the Problem? Many couples own real estate when they separate. After time passes but before the divorce is granted, some people consider home ownership. When married couples acquire a mortgage loan, both usually sign the promissory note, which means they both have a legal obligation to make mortgage payments. That’s pretty straightforward. But when only one spouse signs a promissory note, only he or she owes the money. To oversimplify the problem, if the home-owner dies before becoming divorced, the surviving spouse has no legal responsibility to make the mortgage payments. But regardless of the fact that a married couple is separated, as a spouse, the non-home-owner would still have certain inheritance and survivorship rights to the property. Remedy #1 – Free Trader Agreement Mortgage lenders require parties to sign an FTA, which is an agreed-upon right to buy (i.e., trade) freely (i.e., without interference). Mortgage lenders lend money to buy a home that will be theirs if they foreclose on the loan. They don’t want to share any ownership of the home with the surviving spouse (who isn’t obligated to make mortgage payments). The purpose of an FTA is for the spouse who is not buying the home agrees to waive all claim to it, including inheritance and/or survivorship rights. Usually recorded on public record at the office of the Register of Deeds, these contracts clarify that the spouse buying the home has exclusive ownership of it, even though he or she is married. Because the FTA is a contract, both parties must voluntarily agree to sign it.  Remedy #2 – The Divorce When a divorce decree is granted, the other person is no longer a spouse, so the mortgage lender no longer has the problem of an ex who is still a surviving spouse even if they were separated for some time when the home was...

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Can’t We Just Pick a Date of Separation and Get Our Divorce?

Can’t We Just Pick a Date of Separation and Get Our Divorce?

Can’t We Just Pick a Date of Separation and Get Our Divorce? We hear this question all the time. The short answer is no, you can’t choose a date of separation. In the real world, efficiency and common sense would suggest that you could. But this is not an agreement to apply for “services” from the government. It is a lawsuit, and a judge must use the law. Divorce is a legal status, similar to a legal status of biological parent in a paternity case, for example. Each state has laws dictating how long a married couple must be separated before they are eligible to divorce. Here in North Carolina, the law requires a one-year separation. This should not be confused with our residency requirement. It requires at least one spouse to live in this state for six months before he or she is allowed to file a claim for divorce, even if the parties have already been separated for a year when one spouse moves here. All Divorces Are Lawsuits It can be easy to forget that even uncontested divorces are filed by a plaintiff, served on a defendant, and ruled upon by a judge. In fact, most people don’t even have to be in court. Except for incurable insanity, the only ground for a divorce in North Carolina is a one-year separation. This requires that at least one spouse intends for the separation to be permanent, although there is no requirement that the lawsuit say which spouse intends to remain apart. Examples of one-year separations that don’t fit into this category are couples who are only separated by military service or incarceration. They are not separated unless one spouse intends to remain separated (i.e., that person does not want to move back home when no longer physically separated). The divorce complaint, the document that starts the lawsuit,  cannot even be signed until the day after the year has passed. When you sign the complaint, you do so under oath, under penalty of perjury, which is a crime. Worse yet, if you lie about the DOS, your fraudulently obtained divorce can be set aside (voided) because you were not separated for one full year. Why Do We Have to Wait a Year? The government doesn’t want you to have a fight with your husband or wife, separate for a few days or weeks, get divorced and then reconcile...

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What Do Judges Consider in Alimony Cases?

What Do Judges Consider in Alimony Cases?

What Do Judges Consider in Alimony Cases? By Amy A. Edwards The factors guide judges in reminding them of the most important things. Either spouse may seek alimony if he or she earns less than the other in North Carolina, although there’s no specific dollar amount that determines by how much less. While we have guidelines in child support cases that compute an amount based on incomes and certain child-related expenses, we don’t have anything of that nature for alimony. Each party prepares a budget as a trial exhibit, which includes income and living expenses. If the judge awards it, the amount of alimony and how long it will be paid is discretionary. Alimony Factors: Incomes/Benefits NC judges must consider a list of factors in alimony cases. The first factor to consider is how much income each spouse has, and sometimes what a spouse has the capacity to earn. Also considered is unearned income, which is not shown on a W-2 statement, such as dividends, rents, retirement payments, disability, social security payments and employment benefits such as medical insurance (and/or dental and vision insurance), retirement benefits, and marital property and debts. Alimony Factors: Each Person’s Situation The court considers each spouse’s individual circumstance, education, age, physical and mental abilities, and emotional conditions. For example, a 25-year-old spouse and a 60-year-old spouse will be treated differently based on medical conditions and the ability to work. Their needs and expectations, such as the anticipated date of retirement or going back to school, also vary. Marital misconduct of either spouse may also be considered. Alimony Factors: History of the Marriage The court also looks at the standard of living that the parties established during the marriage. How long the parties were married and the contribution by one spouse to the education, training, or increased earning power of the other spouse are other factors. One party might have kept the home-fires burning for the last ten years, caring for the children while the other devoted his or her energy to obtaining a degree or advance in a profession, improving the family income. In fact, the statute also requires the judge to consider the “extent to which the earning power, expenses, or financial obligations of a spouse will be affected by reason of serving as the custodian of a minor child.” Alimony Factors: Miscellaneous The court looks at family obligations, such as paying child...

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